Tulla Booth Gallery

 

Roberto Dutesco
Roberto Dutesco
Roberto Dutesco
Roberto Dutesco
Roberto Dutesco
Roberto Dutesco
Roberto Dutesco
Roberto Dutesco
Roberto Dutesco
       

 

roberto dutesco

The Wild Horses of Sable Island

 

 

 

The Vision of the Man
Roberto Dutesco has been revealing the beauty of nature and the human spirit through his photography for more than three decades. He first learned of Sable Island and its wild horses in 1994 and made his first trip to the island that same year. A perilous journey by small plane from Halifax and a beach landing brought him to this remarkable place. Over time, and with patience and respect for these living creatures who, in the absence of natural predators, exhibit no fear of humans, he learned the ways of the horses and fell in love with the island in the process.

 

As Dutesco discovered the island for himself over the course of several visits, he captured the beauty and isolation of the wild horses and their austere habitat through still photography and 16-mm film. His incredible journey is presented in a full-length documentary entitled Chasing Wild Horses, which has aired many times on the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) and other media outlets in the U.S. and Europe.

 

In 2008, the Canadian government identified Sable Island as a protected national treasure under the Canada Shipping Act, Bill #227, as a result of Dutesco’s efforts. He says, “This legislation underscores the point that, if natural locations like this are to endure, they must be left alone. I have spent the last eighteen years dedicated to that belief and will continue to work for their preservation for the future.”

 

About Sable Island

Sable Island, located at 43.933 Latitude and 60.007 Longitude, is the site of 475 shipwrecks since the early 17th century. Roughly the length of Manhattan and the width of Central Park, Sable Island is a crescent-shaped sand bar, 42 km long and 1.5 km across at its widest point. Never permanently settled, Sable Island has, however, seen temporary occupation by shipwrecked sailors, transported convicts, pirates and wreckers. The first recorded shipwreck was of one of Sir Humphrey Gilbert’s ships in 1583.